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House of Cards may be most famous for leading the charge of Netflix's original streaming content, but the show's producer Media Rights Capital is ready for all avenues. Just like the first season, season two will get a release on physical discs this summer from Sony Pictures. Frank Underwood's Washington D.C. escapades are ready for viewing in 1080p, and although that's not 4K, at least your ISP's connection to Netflix can't get in the way. One change this year is that there are a few extras on the discs including a behind the scenes look at a table read and dive into Frank's tendency to directly address the viewer -- we'll have to wait and see if Netflix adds special features to the streaming editions before the next season arrives. There's no pricetag yet, but the first season started off at about $50 before settling in near $30, and we'd expect about the same for this one.

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When it comes to electric vehicles, the Chevrolet Volt is as mainstream a brand as it gets. But despite GM's efforts to make the Volt a top choice among EV buyers, demand for it hasn't been what the company expected since it began production in 2010. To turn this situation around, General Motors is said to be planning the release of a more affordable model of its Chevrolet Volt. According to a recent report from Reuters, the automaker has only sold 58,158 Volts to date, which is a staggering number when you consider that the Nissan Leaf has more than 80,000 total sales and counting.

With the 2016 Chevrolet Volt, the automaker will reportedly take a cue from Tesla and offer different models, one being an entry-level version priced "from just over $30,000," compared to the car's current price of $35,000. This rumored price could also help GM undercut its competition, with vehicles like Ford's C-Max Energi and Honda's Accord plug-in hybrid both carrying a much heavier price tag. As a result, however, Reuters states the lower-priced Volt would have a range of under 300 miles and offer "less equipment," so some sacrifices would be necessary. Still, this could be a good thing for you, since you'd have more options to choose from and, better yet, at a more reduced cost. Or, if money's no problem, you could always just buy a Model S and call it a day.

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Samsung's design website shows the Galaxy Note 3

Samsung said it would launch a website that showed off its design chops, and it's delivering as promised. The newly launched Make it Meaningful page dives into the inspirations behind the Korean company's products, complete with an abundance of giant artwork, marketing speak and promo videos. It's not just breathless prose about "timeless" TVs (the S9) and "sharply refined details" (the Galaxy S 4), though. The tech giant also addresses the more pragmatic concerns behind certain products -- Samsung notes that it built one washing machine just for India, where humidity and limited electricity rule out conventional appliances.

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If the fear of an audit wasn't enough to scare you into being honest on your taxes, try this on for size: the IRS might be checking out your Facebook page. The good ol' Internal Revenue Service is reportedly using robots to scope out public social media accounts to catch potential tax dodgers. That means that the government can question if the "business trip" you took to Hawaii was legit based on snorkeling photos from your Instagram account or where you got all those benjamins in that YouTube video.

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Sony 4K TV

Sony has nailed down the final launch details for its newest 4K Bravia TVs, and surprise -- they just might be affordable this year. The "entry-level" XBR-X850B series will start at a relatively frugal $2,099 for a 49-inch model, with prices peaking at $5,499 for a 70-inch set. If you've got a bit more cash and want upgrades to both audio and wall mounting, the XBR-X900B line starts at $3,999 for a 55-inch set and scales up to $8,999 for a 79-inch variant. There's still a couple of models for the money-is-no-object crowd, of course. The improved LED lighting of the 65-inch XBR-X950B will set you back $7,999, while the display's 85-inch sibling costs an eye-watering $24,999. All of the 4K sets ship in June.

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Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden hasn't escaped the NSA's watchful eyes purely by exploiting lax security -- he also uses the right software. He communicates with the media using Tails, a customized version of Linux that makes it easy to use Tor's anonymity network and other tools that keep data private. The software loads from external drives and doesn't store anything locally, so it's relatively trivial for Snowden and his contacts to discuss leaks without leaving a trace.

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Apple and Samsung are duking it out in court yet again, but there's at least one thing they (and a host of their smartphone making rivals) agree on: users shouldn't be helpless when their phones are stolen. That's why, starting in July 2015, all of the smartphones those companies sell in the United States will come with an anti-theft tool meant to help keep your data out of the wrong hands. The full list of backers includes the usual heavyweights: besides Apple and Samsung, there's Google, HTC, Huawei, Microsoft, Motorola, Nokia, along with the country's biggest wireless carriers. Those parties in total represent a tremendous chunk of the American wireless industry, so your next (or next next) smartphone will almost certainly let you stick it to the sticky-fingered.

And what, pray tell, would such tools do? According to the CTIA, users will be able to remotely wipe and restore their devices (say, from a cloud backup), and prevent them from being reactivated or used by unsavory types. That seemingly simple move wouldn't just save us all anguish, it could save us a collective total of $2.5 billion a year in replacement costs and insurance fees. It sure sounds like a win for consumers, but some -- like Senator Mark Leno, who sponsored a bill to create a kill-switch for connected gadgets in the Golden State -- think such tools should be on by default rather than requiring users to opt-in. He's probably on to something, but at least all these companies have a few months to iron out the details.

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It's Tuesday, which is time for the Engadget HD Podcast and we hope you'll join us for the live recording at 8:30PM. No big news to kick off the show this week, but a good quarter for primetime rating will have to do. There is a new wireless box from DirecTV to discuss and of course Netflix, Aereo, Chromecast news -- like just about every week. We finish up with a few tidbits about TiVo, Mohu, CNNx and some content for virtual reality. If you'll be joining us, take a peek at the topics after the break and then get ready to participate in the live chat.

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Twitter IPO Raises $1.82 Billion With Value Topping Facebook

Twitter announced today that it has bought Gnip, a social data company that has packaged and sold data from Twitter to other companies for the past four years. Gnip is one of a few firms that has access to Twitter's "fire hose" of data -- a history of tweets that date back to the company's beginnings in 2006 -- and is one of Twitter's longest-lasting data partners. Such data is tremendously valuable, as Twitter mentioned in a blog post regarding the acquisition:

These public tweets can reveal a wide variety of insights -- so much so that academic institutions, journalists, marketers, brands, politicians and developers regularly use aggregated Twitter data to spot trends, analyze sentiment, find breaking news, connect with customers and much more.

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